Within the Complex Behavioural Interventions theme, we will use personalised technologies, such as wearables and smartphones, together with online interventions, to support health promotion, illness prevention, treatment, and management.

This is in the domains of both physical and mental health recognising the particular complexities involved in comorbidities.

In the developed world, many of the most prevalent physical health conditions are as a result of, and are modifiable by changes in, lifestyle or behavioural factors, such as physical activity, diet, tobacco and alcohol consumption, and compliance with medication regimes. Additionally, mental ill-health is a leading global cause of disability.

Technologies can be harnessed to support people in changing their physical health and mental health related behaviours, providing a means for both primary and secondary prevention in long-term conditions and the facilitation of self-management. Furthermore, e-mental health programs can be used in the treatment of mental ill-health by offering readily available and accessible (anytime, anywhere) therapeutic content, either for self-help format or as an augmentation of more traditional forms of therapies.

We bring together researchers in CATCH, with strong track record in the use of technology for behaviour change support, and implementation within the NHS  (Mawson, Cudd, Hawley, Parker funded by NIHR (£0.8M)) with experts in the Social and Health Psychology group (Department of Psychology – Norman, Webb, Millings) who carry out world-leading research on behaviour and behaviour change interventions, and experts in Clinical Psychology (Clinical Psychology Unit and ScHARR – Parry, Barkham) who are world leaders in research into psychological services. 

This combination of expertise allows leading theoretical and applied research in psychological behaviour change techniques to be applied to healthcare interventions delivered via smart technologies. The aim is to develop and optimise technology-supported interventions, including self-managed interventions, which promote healthy behaviours and mental health.   

Outcomes are technology-supported interventions which promote long-term change in health-related behaviours in people with physical and mental long-term conditions, leading to reduced incidence of deterioration in conditions and therefore increased quality of life and reduced burden on the NHS.

 

Projects in Complex Behavioural Interventions

 

Key Publications in Complex Behavioural Interventions

Title Authors Year
Core Belief Content Examined in a Large Sample of Patients using Online Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. Journal of Affective Disorders doi:10.1016/j.jad.2015.06.044 Millings A and Carnelley K 2015
(Inter)personal computing: The role of the therapeutic relationship in e-mental health. Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy, 43, 197–206
doi: 10.1007/s10879-013-9242-z
Cavanagh K and Millings A 2013
A Personalized Self-Management Rehabilitation System with an Intelligent Shoe for Stroke Survivors: A Realist Evaluation JMIR Rehabil Assist Technol 2016;3 (1):e1 URL: http://rehab.jmir.org/2016/1/e1
doi: 10.2196/rehab.5079
Mawson S, Nasr N, Parker J, Davies R, Zheng H, Mountain G 2016
The SMART personalised self-management system for congestive heart failure: results of a realist evaluation BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making.2014, 14:109
doi: 10.1186/s12911-014-0109-3
Bartlett K Y, Haywood  A, Bentley L C, Parker J, Hawley S M, Mountain A G and Mawson S 2014
Feasibility study of portable technology for weight loss and HbA1c control in type 2 diabetes. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 16(1), 1. Bentley C L, Otesile O, Bacigalupo R, Elliott J, Noble H, Hawley M S and Cudd P 2016

Members working in Complex Behavioural Interventions

Name Dept (faculty) Research strengths
Dr Abigail Millings
Research Lead
Psychology (Science)  Implementation of assistive technologies (including internet cognitive behavioural therapy)
Attachment and e-health technology
Technology for health and wellbeing
supported by
Prof Arlene Astell
ScHARR (MDH) Creative applications of technology to support ageing and healthy living
Interventions to support cognitive function and mental health
Support for people with dementia

 

Name Dept (faculty) Research strengths
Prof Mark Hawley ScHARR (MDH) Assistive Technology
Telehealth and Telecare
Digital Healthcare
Dr Peter Cudd ScHARR (MDH)
Prof Sue Mawson ScHARR (MDH) Applied research and knowledge translation to patient care
Improving quality of life for people with neurological problems
Effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions
Dr Thomas Webb Psychology (Science) Self regulation and behavior change
Implementation intention plans
Prof Paul Norman Psychology (Science) Social cognition models
Theory based interventions to change health behaviour
Cognitive adaptation to serious illness

 

Explore the other research areas:

Assistive Robotics & Social Robotics

Assistive Robotics & Social Robotics

Intelligent Personalised Support

Intelligent Personalised Support

Human Communication Technology

Human Communication Technology

Complex Behavioural Interventions

Complex Behavioural Interventions